Rabbit 911- how to make an emergency kit for your rabbitry

Every rabbit barn needs an emergency kit on hand in case of crisis, and general maintenance. A well stocked kit can mean the difference between life and death in a crisis, especially since rabbits seem to always get ill in the middle of the night or on the weekends when getting to the necessary tools may not be possible. The following is a list of rabbit items that you should keep on hand when operating any kind of breeding program. This may seem like a really long list, but in the years that I have been breeding rabbits I have had to use every single one of the items on this list multiple times. Items in RED are essential  items.


  • Wazine 17 (general maintenance, wormer)
  • Albon (for treatment of coccidiosis)
  • Corid (for routine prevention of coccidiosis)
  • Ivermectin/Ivermec (general maintenance, anti-parasitic, useful for mites especially)
  • Blue Kote (useful for fungal infections as well as sore hocks and abrasions)
  • Vetericyn spray/gel (abrasions and mild injuries)
  • Terramycin gel (useful for nestbox eye and other eye infections)
  • Tetracycline powder (useful as an antibiotic for injuries)
  • Penicillin G injectable
  • 22-24 gauge needles and 3 cc syringes
  • Bunnyvac vaccine (for snuffles, should you decide to vaccinate)
  • Antibiotic ointment such as Neosporin
  • Baby food (sweet potato is very popular)
  • Electrolyte powder for hot weather, travels and rabbits who aren’t drinking a lot
  • Probios, for rabbits with upset stomachs who aren’t eating well
  • 4 way acid pack, for rabbits who aren’t eating and drinking well
  • Styptic powder, for stopping nail bleeds
  • Gauze, cotton balls and q-tips.
  • Vet wrap
  • Nail clippers
  • Alcohol and peroxide
  • Heat lamp, for quickly warming chilled kits
  • Mineral oil or olive oil for stubborn ear wax. Aloe also works
  • Preparation H for treating scars
  • Super Glue, useful for gluing together small injuries
  • Iodine (use prior to any small surgeries such as lancing an abscess)
  • Stethoscope
  • Scale ( I recommend a postal scale with a detached display)
  • Tattoo gun
  • GiGi's numbing spray, or a lidocaine gel to numb ears prior to tattooing
  • Bunnybalm, or tattoo goo, or similar tattoo healing spread
  • Bag-Balm, udder balm. Useful for a nursing doe with chapped or inflamed teats.
  • Vet RX, useful for small allergies, swollen nares due to weather and pollen related snot. Helps to clear the nose so they can breathe better. Not recommended or considered a treatment for bacterial infections such as pasteurella or bordetella.
  • Infant gas drops (Simethicone)- for bloat/GI stasis
  • Critical Care (for GI stasis, emaciated rabbits and rabbits on a hunger strike)
  • Canned pumpkin
  • Safeguard (fenbendazole)- anti parasitic
  • Nutrical, appetite stimulant
  • Oxytocin (available through a vet only and should only be used by experienced breeders)
  • Disposable scalpels
  • Surgical gloves
  • Large towels
  • Puppy Pee Pads
  • Hand sanitizer
  • Diatomaceous Earth, very useful to keep away fleas and pests.